definition of forgive
Images via Shutterstock

The Daze of Awe

by Dara Resnik Creasey

Unless you’re living under a rock in Runyon, you know it was Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, this past Thursday. We are now in the midst of the Ten Days of Awe, in which us Jewish Angelenos are supposed to ask forgiveness for the sins of our Hollywood year. The Yom Kippur prayer, Al Chet, is a list of sins for which we take communal responsibility:

For the sin of name dropping: Please forgive me.

For the sin of resenting a friend’s success: Please forgive me.

For the sin of hating SoHo House: Please forgive me.

For the sin of judging you because you belong to SoHo House: Please forgive me.

For the sin of Tweeting when I should be working: Please forgive me.

For the sin of Facebooking when I should be writing: Please forgive me.

For the sin of hoping your promotion means something good for me: Please forgive me.

For the sin of reading Deadline and wishing I had sold that project: Please forgive me.

For the sin of ever reading Deadline: Please forgive me.

For the sin of not reading Deadline: Please forgive me.

For the sin of chasing that project just for the payday: Please forgive me.

For the sin of writing what I think others want instead of what I truly believe in: Please forgive me.

For the sin of lying that I’m already booked at 4pm so I don’t have to drive home from a Westside meeting during rush hour: Please forgive me.

For the sin of having drinks with an executive just for the free booze: Please forgive me.

For the sin of having dinner with a potential manager just for the free food: Please forgive me.

For the sin of picking a restaurant a little (or a lot) closer to me than to that executive or manager: Please forgive me.

For the sin of believing I deserve to be where I am over anyone else: Please forgive me.

For the sin of believing you deserve to be where you are over me: Please forgive me.

For the sin of saying I loved the movie because you invited me to the premiere: Please forgive me.

For the sin of offering to read your script when I have no intention of reading your script: Please forgive me.

For the sin of swearing we’ll get together soon when we know deep down we won’t make the time: Please forgive me.

For the sin of keeping the studio ID from a former gig to skip the line and get on the lot for a meeting: Please forgive me.

For the sin of using said studio ID to get into museums and receive discounts on my cellphone bill: Please forgive me.

For the sin of re-gifting the wine that producer sent for my birthday: Please forgive me.

For the sin handing in a project on Sunday instead of Friday so you don’t have all weekend to think about your notes: Please forgive me.

For the sin of joining Mommy & Me just for the networking: Please forgive me.

For the sin of pretending I don’t have a baby in meetings with People Who Clearly Hate Children: Please forgive me.

For the sin of snagging an extra bottle of water from your office because I’m going to take it to the gym later: Please forgive me.

For the sin of saying I’m still a New Yorker while buying a pink tank-top: Please forgive me.

For the sin of promising every film school class I speak to that success in this business is just a matter of hard work: Please forgive me.

For the sin of promising my husband and writing partner that writing these posts will never get in the way of nookie: Please forgive me.

For all these sins forgive me, pardon me, grant me atonement … and an overall deal at a studio with an office and assistant.

And let us say: Amen.

Dara Resnik Creasey

About Dara Resnik Creasey

Dara Resnik Creasey is a Jewish former Manhattanite who writes film and television with her goyish Coloradan husband, Chad Gomez Creasey. Among their credits are Sydney White, Pushing Daisies, Mistresses, and Castle. Dara loves John Hughes, couponing, and the New York Giants/Mets/Rangers/Knicks in no particular order of importance. Follow Dara on Twitter @daracreasey

Tags: , , , , , ,
.